Ello's World

Be the hero of your own story

322 notes

malindalo:

As I said last night on twitter: To everyone who thinks it’s bizarre or shocking or scary to write lesbians into fantasy novels: do it anyway. It is awesome is what it is.
To clarify because this is tumblr and now I have more than 140 characters, what I mean is every so often I see someone blogging or tumblring or tweeting about how difficult they find the concept of writing about lesbians is, especially in speculative fiction. And by difficult I mean they really want to — maybe they’re lesbians themselves — but they’ve been conditioned by the mainstream to believe that (1) lesbians don’t exist in fantasy so if you put them in there it will be “bizarre”; (2) putting lesbians in fantasy will shock mainstream readers and thus the story/novel won’t sell so it’s not worth the time to write it*; (3) writing lesbians is scary because there are so few of them in SFF what if you get it wrong/it’s frightening to write something you desperately want to see/myriad other writerly fears based on marginalization.
So that explanation went on longer than I anticipated. There are lots of fears. They can stop you. But I hope you’ll push through them to the other side, which is full of awesome lesbians in fantasy! (And every other genre, I might add.)
* This was my biggest fear before I wrote Ash.

malindalo:

As I said last night on twitter: To everyone who thinks it’s bizarre or shocking or scary to write lesbians into fantasy novels: do it anyway. It is awesome is what it is.

To clarify because this is tumblr and now I have more than 140 characters, what I mean is every so often I see someone blogging or tumblring or tweeting about how difficult they find the concept of writing about lesbians is, especially in speculative fiction. And by difficult I mean they really want to — maybe they’re lesbians themselves — but they’ve been conditioned by the mainstream to believe that (1) lesbians don’t exist in fantasy so if you put them in there it will be “bizarre”; (2) putting lesbians in fantasy will shock mainstream readers and thus the story/novel won’t sell so it’s not worth the time to write it*; (3) writing lesbians is scary because there are so few of them in SFF what if you get it wrong/it’s frightening to write something you desperately want to see/myriad other writerly fears based on marginalization.

So that explanation went on longer than I anticipated. There are lots of fears. They can stop you. But I hope you’ll push through them to the other side, which is full of awesome lesbians in fantasy! (And every other genre, I might add.)

* This was my biggest fear before I wrote Ash.

(via mzchristie)

114 notes

Cape's board abolishes entire reading list

weneeddiversebooks:

catagator:

diversityinya:

If you’ve been following the story of a Delaware school board’s decision to remove The Miseducation of Cameron Post from its high school summer reading list, apparently the final decision is in — the entire reading list has now been removed.

That means not only has Cameron Post been removed, other books including Gene Luen Yang’s Boxers, Rainbow Rowell’s Eleanor & Park, John Lewis’s March, and even John Green’s The Fault in Our Stars will no longer be recommended as summer reads for incoming freshman at Cape Henlopen High School. A sad end to a really wonderful and diverse reading list.

Not just a wonderful and diverse reading list, but a reading list put together by librarians who work hard to choose titles that are developmentally and content appropriate for teenagers. Who know what books these kids need and DESERVE to be reading and thinking about.

The actions this Board took undermine the knowledge and experience of the educators employed by this school to do right by those kids. 

Unbelievable!!! This is why we need to EDUCATE people on the importance of diversity!!!

51 notes

weneeddiversebooks:

The #WNDB team is DELIGHTED to announce that it has recently welcomed some new team members! We’ll be highlighting them on this site over the next few days. Please give a warm welcome to Kristy Shen and Bryce Leung, who have been working night and day as newly-minted #WNDB Webmasters. 

Bryce and Kristy are engineers and a husband and wife writing tag-team Their awesome middle grade debut Little Miss Evil (Spencer Hill Middle Grade) comes out March 1, 2015. Here’s the blurb for their book:

When you live in a volcano, ride to school in a helicopter, and regularly see your dad on the news with the caption “EVIL GENIUS” underneath his picture, it takes a lot to rattle you.

Until you get a message that says: We have your father. Deliver the NOVA in 24 hours or we will kill him.

What’s a NOVA you ask? It’s a nuclear bomb capable of turning the city into a radioactive mushroom cloud, and ever since Fiona’s dad built it, it’s caused nothing but grief. But telling him to stop building weapons is like telling Michelangelo to stop painting.


And that’s why thirteen-year-old Fiona has a flamethrower strapped to her arm. After all, who’d mess with a girl who can throw fireballs?

Apparently, these guys.

Big mistake.

Give Bryce and Kristy a warm welcome by adding Little Miss Evil to your Goodreads shelf. And when our amazing new #WNDB website goes up, know that they deserve the lion’s share of the credit! 

Yay, Bryce and Kristy!!!

82,425 notes

exemplaryetoile:

confessionsofamichaelstipe:

THIS IS WHAT A WORLD LEADER LOOKS LIKE.  
DESMOND TUTU, I OFFICIALLY LOVE YOU.
      -MICHAEL STIPE  

"I would refuse to go to a homophobic heaven. No, I would say sorry, I mean I would much rather go to the other place," Archbishop Tutu said at the launch of the Free and Equal campaign in Cape Town.
"I would not worship a God who is homophobic and that is how deeply I feel about this."
Archbishop Tutu said the campaign against homophobia was similar to the campaign waged against racism in South Africa.
"I am as passionate about this campaign as I ever was about apartheid. For me, it is at the same level," he added.
[source: BBC News]

exemplaryetoile:

confessionsofamichaelstipe:

THIS IS WHAT A WORLD LEADER LOOKS LIKE.  

DESMOND TUTU, I OFFICIALLY LOVE YOU.

      -MICHAEL STIPE  

"I would refuse to go to a homophobic heaven. No, I would say sorry, I mean I would much rather go to the other place," Archbishop Tutu said at the launch of the Free and Equal campaign in Cape Town.

"I would not worship a God who is homophobic and that is how deeply I feel about this."

Archbishop Tutu said the campaign against homophobia was similar to the campaign waged against racism in South Africa.

"I am as passionate about this campaign as I ever was about apartheid. For me, it is at the same level," he added.

[source: BBC News]

(via frenchfryempress)

837 notes

notbecauseofvictories:

Lucy Liu as Aragorn Arawend, daughter of Arathorn—healer, warrior, Ranger of the North, Isildur’s heir, and High Queen of Gondor and Arnor. After leading the army of the West in the final defeat of Sauron’s forces, she was crowned Queen Elessar, also called Envinyatallë, the renewer. First in the line of Telcontillë, her reign was marked by great harmony and prosperity within the reunited kingdom, and renewed cooperation between the races. She died at the age of 210, after a reign of 120 years.

(part of the series YOU LOOK UPON A WOMAN, a project which reimagines Lord of the Rings with a cast of women of color)

(via isanah)

2,816 notes

Anonymous asked: You're really just looking for something else to complain about bc you probably ran out of shit to bitch about from your amazing life :((((((( poor you, people appreciate your culture :((;;;

j4ya:

Okay. Okay, sure, let’s talk about my amazing life.

Yeah, I came to the states at the age of 6. I was immediately enrolled into elementary school. Even though I had completed first grade and was set to start second, they told me I had to take first grade over again because they didn’t know if my education was up to/matched with American standards. Do you know what being educated overseas is like, especially in Asia? (Let me guess—you probably don’t.) I was bilingual by the time I was 4/5. We learn twice the amount Americans do. That was the first time I was told that my upbringing, my culture, was not important.

I started going to grade school and right off the bat, the first things the kids noticed about me, of course, was my thick Indian accent. Teachers scolded the children who made fun of me, but they never once tried to assure me that the way I spoke was okay. I was corrected, coached, and taught to speak ‘American’ so well that by the time I turned 10, no one believed I had moved here from India. And that was considered good. I learned that the way I spoke was wrong, and to be respected and accepted by my peers, I had to erase a huge link to my cultural background.

That wasn’t it, though. My mom made some of my clothes, because she was great at sewing, and it did save us a lot of money, but unfortunately, India was a few years behind on fashion and a lot of Indian clothing for children is fairly unisex/gender-neutral, so people made fun of me for the way I dressed—in plain, gender-neutral clothing—because I didn’t ‘look like a girl’. 

I had oil put in my hair—it’s a great treatment for all hair, it really nourishes the scalp. But girls called my hair oily, greasy, smelly. Honestly, it was probably healthier than all their hair combined. And today? These girls are climbing over each other to find organic coconut oil to use on their weak, brittle, dead hair to try and make it look like mine.

My mom cooked a lot in our apartment, and sure, you guys are great with eating Indian food when you go out to eat, but do you know how much work it takes? Our whole apartment would fill up with the mouth-watering smells of spices and dishes my mom made but if I showed up to school with the smell on my clothes, kids declared that I was smelly. I smelled like food, the same food, mind you, that these kids would grow up to love to eat every time they went out to eat at their local Indian restaurant, but they saw it as disgusting, because in their households, with their bland white bread and dry-ass meatloaf, they honestly had no idea what it took to flavor a meal. 

Worse than that, I brought some Indian food to lunch, and all the girls at my table made a face. They called it weird and gross, and actually made me pine and desire for their boring two-ingredient sandwiches. I had to tell my mom to stop packing me food that looked and smelled Indian for school, and though I didn’t really notice it at the time, today I can clearly remember how heartbroken she was upon hearing that from me. She struggled to teach herself American cuisine so that I would not feel uncomfortable at school. She did that. For me. I’m tearing up right now typing this, because she knew how desperate I was to make friends, and she taught herself all this for me. 

Growing up was not easy for me. I had to fight through a lot to be comfortable with myself, my identity, my culture, and my upbringing. Even today it’s not easy. Do you know the pressure on Indian kids to succeed, especially academically? One time I forgot to do a sheet of homework in 5th grade and rather than taking the late slip to my mom to have her sign it—because I knew I’d be in trouble—I forged her signature to get out of it. At only 10 years old. That’s how scared I was of messing up in school. That’s the kind of pressure there is on us. 

But at the same time, you want us to be happy with you people, to smile at you people, the same people who, when we were growing up, bullied us without mercy, made fun of how we were raised, made us embarrassed for you to come over and catch a whiff of our fragrant kitchens, made us change our lunches, our hairstyles, our clothes, just to appease you. So fuck you. Fuck you and your stupid ‘appreciation’ of my culture. You only choose to appreciate it now that you can see the value of it, but if you were not able to appreciate it years ago, when I was just a 7-year-old immigrant girl crying alone on the blacktop because no one would be friends with me, then you sure as hell do not have the fucking right to appreciate it now, let alone come to me and mock me for having no troubles in my life, especially since people like you were the cause of all my troubles growing up.

1,953 notes

wocinsolidarity:

ethiopienne:

Support Trans Women of Color Collective

TWOCC was established almost one year ago after the brutal murder of Islan Nettles, a black trans woman in New York City. Since then we have brought visibility to this case and uplifted the narratives of struggle and resilience from our communities. From our multiple appearances at conferences, to our various talks, and our numerous accountability sessions we have created a new space for trans women of color leadership in the movement.We are an organizing collective, NOT a registered non-profit. We rely on grassroots fundraising to sustain the work. Trans women of color have historically — and continue to — put our bodies on the line for justice. The amount of unpaid emotional, physical, and psychological labor we do for our movements is astronomical. We are tired of the lip service that our allies give to trans women of color issues. We believe that the role of allies in our movement is to fund us so that we can do the work for ourselves! This is a fundraising campaign lead by allies to support our work. We need YOUR change, to make our own!


BOOST

wocinsolidarity:

ethiopienne:

Support Trans Women of Color Collective

TWOCC was established almost one year ago after the brutal murder of Islan Nettles, a black trans woman in New York City. Since then we have brought visibility to this case and uplifted the narratives of struggle and resilience from our communities. From our multiple appearances at conferences, to our various talks, and our numerous accountability sessions we have created a new space for trans women of color leadership in the movement.

We are an organizing collective, NOT a registered non-profit. We rely on grassroots fundraising to sustain the work. Trans women of color have historically — and continue to — put our bodies on the line for justice. The amount of unpaid emotional, physical, and psychological labor we do for our movements is astronomical. We are tired of the lip service that our allies give to trans women of color issues. We believe that the role of allies in our movement is to fund us so that we can do the work for ourselves! This is a fundraising campaign lead by allies to support our work. We need YOUR change, to make our own!

BOOST

4,281 notes

At one hearing, a blind woman tearfully explained how she lost a prestigious scholarship opportunity after her GPA fell because her reader was laid off. That classroom assistance was essential because math figures needed verbal translation.

Another mobility-impaired student testified that losing transportation services made moving between campus buildings extremely painful. It also affected her grades when attending some classes became impossible.

Disabled Community College Students Fight Budget Cuts in Classroom AT and Other Academic Supports

Funding for California community colleges was cut by 10%. Funding to disabled student services at California community colleges was cut by 40%.

(via disabilityhistory)

(via seriouslystella)